DATA CENTER AND SERVER | CLOUD

Advanced Search Integration

Overview

The Jira Query Language (JQL) provides advanced queries to search for issues in a structured way. The result of an advanced query is displayed as a list of issues in the issue navigator. Advanced queries can be saved for private use or to share with other users.

R4J extends JQL with extra query functions that take advantage of its distinctive data structures, including the Project Tree, Baselines and Suspect Links. Whenever you are composing an advanced query in Jira, you can add these functions to the query, in the same way that you use Jira’s own query functions.

Path Names

Some query functions require the name of a path in the project tree as parameter. The name is formed by concatenating the names of the folders, starting with the root folder and using the character “/” to separate the names. The resulting string is then enclosed in quotation marks - e.g. “Fitness for You/Business and User Requirements/Track Activity”.

In order to support searching within child issues, the path name may also include one or more issue keys. For example, to search for children of issue F4Y-1, add that key to the previous path to form the following path: “Fitness for You/Business and User Requirements/Track Activity/F4Y-1”.

Function Reference

requirementsPath()

Find issues that are contained directly or indirectly in a specific path in the requirements tree of a project. Issues that are children of other issues are also returned. Note that a recursive search is performed, so that all issues under the given path are returned, no matter how deep the hierarchy is.

Syntax

requirementsPath(path)

Supported fields

Issue

Supported operators

IN , NOT IN

Examples

Find issues contained directly or indirectly in a given project folder:

issue IN requirementsPath("Fitness for You/Business and User Requirements/Track Activity")

requirementsFolder()

Find issues that are directly contained in a specific path in the requirements tree of a project. Issues that are the direct children of other issues are also returned. Unlike the function requirementsPath(), the search is not recursive - that is, it stops as the given folder or issue.

Syntax

requirementsFolder(path)

Supported fields

Issue

Supported operators

IN , NOT IN

Examples

Find issues contained in a given project folder, without searching child folders or issues:

issue IN requirementsFolder("Fitness for You/Business and User Requirements/Track Activity")

requirementsBaseline()

Find issues contained in a specific baseline.

The Jira issue navigator returns the latest revision of an issue, so the results of this query do not reflect the state of the issue as it was in the baseline.

Syntax

requirementsBaseline(baselineName)

Supported fields

Issue

Supported operators

IN , NOT IN

Examples

Find issues in a given baseline:

issue IN requirementsBaseline("v1")

changedBetweenBaselines()

Finds issues that are 1) in both the specified baselines and 2) changed between the baselines. It is necessary to specify the baseline’s project by either its name or key. The baselines may be in different projects.

The Jira issue navigator returns the latest revision of an issue, so the results of this query do not reflect the state of the issue as it was in the baseline.

Syntax

changedBetweenBaselines(projectA, baselineNameA, projectB, baselineNameB)

Supported fields

Issue

Supported operators

IN , NOT IN

Examples

Find issues changed between baselines v1 and v2 in project with key F4Y:

issue IN changedBetweenBaselines("F4Y", "v1","F4Y", "v2")

hasSuspectLink()

Find issues that are connected by links of one or more given types such that the links are marked as Suspect Links. The link types are specified either by the name of the link type (e.g. “trace”) or the inward or outward descriptions of the type (e.g. “trace from”, “trace to”).

Syntax

hasSuspectLink(linkType1[, linkType2, ..., linkTypeN])

Supported fields

Issue

Supported operators

IN , NOT IN

Examples

Find issues that have suspect links with the inward or outward descriptions “trace from” or “trace to”:

issue IN hasSuspectLink(“trace from”, “trace to”)

hasLink()

Find issues connected by links of given types. The link types are specified by the inward or outward descriptions of the type (e.g. “trace from”, “trace to”).

Syntax

hasLink(linkType1[, linkType2, ..., linkTypeN])

Supported fields

Issue

Supported operators

IN , NOT IN

Examples

Find issues that are linked with the inward or outward descriptions “trace from” or “trace to”:

issue IN hasLink(“trace from”, “trace to”)

hasLinkToProject()

Find issues connected by links of given link types, such that the linked issue belongs to a specific project. The link types are specified by the inward or outward descriptions of the type (e.g. “trace from”, “trace to”).

Syntax

hasLinkToProject(projectName, linkType1[, linkType2, ..., linkTypeN])

Supported fields

Issue

Supported operators

IN , NOT IN

Examples

Find issues that are linked with the inward or outward descriptions “trace from” or “trace to” and the linked issue belongs to project F4Y:

issue IN hasLink("F4Y", “trace from”, “trace to”)